Suddenly Im Hit

There’s plenty about him that is adventurous and unlike anything else I’ve heard, but at the core of it is a traditional and deeply human talent that keeps his songs invigorating. He’s always had something to say, and with Retrograde, it feels like he’s started talking. “Retrograde” was the first single from James Blake’s 2013 album Overgrown. Retrograde is the suddenly moment of James Blake’s career. Everything he’s put out until now has been intelligent, haunting and full of feeling, but to my ears, it had become saturated.

Overgrown is the second studio album by English electronic musician James Blake. It was released on 5 April 2013 by Blake's ATLAS Records, along with A&M Records and Polydor Records. The album features guest appearances from noted electronic music producer Brian Eno and Wu-Tang Clan member RZA.[3] Overgrown debuted at number eight on the UK Albums Chart and at number one of the US Dance/Electronic chart, becoming Blake's highest-charting album to date.

Powered by James Blake lyrics are property and of their owners. "Retrograde" lyrics provided for educational purposes and personal use only. I can’t wait to listen to the entire album and I’m very much looking forward to an opportunity to hear this genius self-sampling, multitasking, instrument-mixing voice magician live once again. I barely knew him back when I saw him live in 2011, I had just spent an entire afternoon indulging in the sounds of the James Blake LP hanging by myself in a hammock at a friends house on the same day that we were going to the concert. The most we’ve heard from dubstep’s poster-boy lyric-wise has come to us in the form of unravelling snippets that he’s toyed with, filtered, twisted around one another and approached more like tools of expression than statements of intent.

On ‘Klavierwerke’ EP track Tell Her Safe, I hear the word “help” groaning out of those opening bars, and I trace my own half-remembered, nonsensical lyrics through the hazy clamour of synths as I sing along. On Retrograde, such a leap of imagination isn’t necessary, but that doesn’t mean I’m less engaged – it’s a lesson Blake has obviously learnt and a confident, conscious decision. He trusts you to trust him, as he draws on his influences and ideas with a more obvious brushstroke (discernible beats and lyrics bring him closer to the R&B spectrum than he’s been before) but loses none of his power for doing it. As well as the swell of “suddenly”, there’s the wallowing drop of the first time he sings the line “we’re alone now”, and the listless refrain of “and your friends are gone/ and your friends won’t come”.

It was supported by lead single "Retrograde". James Blake’s voice has always struck me as his most powerful instrument. It’s the kind of opinion that draws a lot of scepticism out of people. You don’t love James Blake for his voice; you love him for his pioneering of wistful and wilting electronics, for the deft and clever production of his EPs and astounding debut album, for his ability to make a party with Trim completely go off. There’s a classical basis to James Blake, though.

Suddenly, it hits. I have always been a listener who goes in search of lyrics, though.

The closest he’s come to storytelling was his resounding Feist cover Limit To Your Love and last year’s bleak and beautiful Joni Mitchell cover, A Case Of You, which was, suddenly, just him and a piano. These moments were the glimmers of personality and narrative arc that hinted at a bold songwriting talent, but all his original music stuck firmly to the territory of ideas.

It needed some warmth. With the tender touches of the ‘Enough Thunder’ EP, he moved towards it, but nothing blind-sided the listener so suddenly, so incredibly, as this distinct step forward. It’s a moment that pulls on the human anchor of the musician’s talent without ever losing its technical wonder.

There’s plenty about him that is adventurous and unlike anything else I’ve heard, but at the core of it is a traditional and deeply human talent that keeps his songs invigorating. He’s always had something to say, and with Retrograde, it feels like he’s started talking. “Retrograde” was the first single from James Blake’s 2013 album Overgrown. Retrograde is the suddenly moment of James Blake’s career. Everything he’s put out until now has been intelligent, haunting and full of feeling, but to my ears, it had become saturated.

It was supported by lead single "Retrograde". James Blake’s voice has always struck me as his most powerful instrument. It’s the kind of opinion that draws a lot of scepticism out of people. You don’t love James Blake for his voice; you love him for his pioneering of wistful and wilting electronics, for the deft and clever production of his EPs and astounding debut album, for his ability to make a party with Trim completely go off. There’s a classical basis to James Blake, though.

On ‘Klavierwerke’ EP track Tell Her Safe, I hear the word “help” groaning out of those opening bars, and I trace my own half-remembered, nonsensical lyrics through the hazy clamour of synths as I sing along. On Retrograde, such a leap of imagination isn’t necessary, but that doesn’t mean I’m less engaged – it’s a lesson Blake has obviously learnt and a confident, conscious decision. He trusts you to trust him, as he draws on his influences and ideas with a more obvious brushstroke (discernible beats and lyrics bring him closer to the R&B spectrum than he’s been before) but loses none of his power for doing it. As well as the swell of “suddenly”, there’s the wallowing drop of the first time he sings the line “we’re alone now”, and the listless refrain of “and your friends are gone/ and your friends won’t come”.

It needed some warmth. With the tender touches of the ‘Enough Thunder’ EP, he moved towards it, but nothing blind-sided the listener so suddenly, so incredibly, as this distinct step forward. It’s a moment that pulls on the human anchor of the musician’s talent without ever losing its technical wonder.

The closest he’s come to storytelling was his resounding Feist cover Limit To Your Love and last year’s bleak and beautiful Joni Mitchell cover, A Case Of You, which was, suddenly, just him and a piano. These moments were the glimmers of personality and narrative arc that hinted at a bold songwriting talent, but all his original music stuck firmly to the territory of ideas.

Overgrown is the second studio album by English electronic musician James Blake. It was released on 5 April 2013 by Blake's ATLAS Records, along with A&M Records and Polydor Records. The album features guest appearances from noted electronic music producer Brian Eno and Wu-Tang Clan member RZA.[3] Overgrown debuted at number eight on the UK Albums Chart and at number one of the US Dance/Electronic chart, becoming Blake's highest-charting album to date.

There’s plenty about him that is adventurous and unlike anything else I’ve heard, but at the core of it is a traditional and deeply human talent that keeps his songs invigorating. He’s always had something to say, and with Retrograde, it feels like he’s started talking. “Retrograde” was the first single from James Blake’s 2013 album Overgrown. Retrograde is the suddenly moment of James Blake’s career. Everything he’s put out until now has been intelligent, haunting and full of feeling, but to my ears, it had become saturated.

Powered by James Blake lyrics are property and of their owners. "Retrograde" lyrics provided for educational purposes and personal use only. I can’t wait to listen to the entire album and I’m very much looking forward to an opportunity to hear this genius self-sampling, multitasking, instrument-mixing voice magician live once again. I barely knew him back when I saw him live in 2011, I had just spent an entire afternoon indulging in the sounds of the James Blake LP hanging by myself in a hammock at a friends house on the same day that we were going to the concert. The most we’ve heard from dubstep’s poster-boy lyric-wise has come to us in the form of unravelling snippets that he’s toyed with, filtered, twisted around one another and approached more like tools of expression than statements of intent.

Suddenly, it hits. I have always been a listener who goes in search of lyrics, though.

On ‘Klavierwerke’ EP track Tell Her Safe, I hear the word “help” groaning out of those opening bars, and I trace my own half-remembered, nonsensical lyrics through the hazy clamour of synths as I sing along. On Retrograde, such a leap of imagination isn’t necessary, but that doesn’t mean I’m less engaged – it’s a lesson Blake has obviously learnt and a confident, conscious decision. He trusts you to trust him, as he draws on his influences and ideas with a more obvious brushstroke (discernible beats and lyrics bring him closer to the R&B spectrum than he’s been before) but loses none of his power for doing it. As well as the swell of “suddenly”, there’s the wallowing drop of the first time he sings the line “we’re alone now”, and the listless refrain of “and your friends are gone/ and your friends won’t come”.

Overgrown is the second studio album by English electronic musician James Blake. It was released on 5 April 2013 by Blake's ATLAS Records, along with A&M Records and Polydor Records. The album features guest appearances from noted electronic music producer Brian Eno and Wu-Tang Clan member RZA.[3] Overgrown debuted at number eight on the UK Albums Chart and at number one of the US Dance/Electronic chart, becoming Blake's highest-charting album to date.

Powered by James Blake lyrics are property and of their owners. "Retrograde" lyrics provided for educational purposes and personal use only. I can’t wait to listen to the entire album and I’m very much looking forward to an opportunity to hear this genius self-sampling, multitasking, instrument-mixing voice magician live once again. I barely knew him back when I saw him live in 2011, I had just spent an entire afternoon indulging in the sounds of the James Blake LP hanging by myself in a hammock at a friends house on the same day that we were going to the concert. The most we’ve heard from dubstep’s poster-boy lyric-wise has come to us in the form of unravelling snippets that he’s toyed with, filtered, twisted around one another and approached more like tools of expression than statements of intent.

It was supported by lead single "Retrograde". James Blake’s voice has always struck me as his most powerful instrument. It’s the kind of opinion that draws a lot of scepticism out of people. You don’t love James Blake for his voice; you love him for his pioneering of wistful and wilting electronics, for the deft and clever production of his EPs and astounding debut album, for his ability to make a party with Trim completely go off. There’s a classical basis to James Blake, though.

Suddenly, it hits. I have always been a listener who goes in search of lyrics, though.

The closest he’s come to storytelling was his resounding Feist cover Limit To Your Love and last year’s bleak and beautiful Joni Mitchell cover, A Case Of You, which was, suddenly, just him and a piano. These moments were the glimmers of personality and narrative arc that hinted at a bold songwriting talent, but all his original music stuck firmly to the territory of ideas.

It needed some warmth. With the tender touches of the ‘Enough Thunder’ EP, he moved towards it, but nothing blind-sided the listener so suddenly, so incredibly, as this distinct step forward. It’s a moment that pulls on the human anchor of the musician’s talent without ever losing its technical wonder.