Stem And Fem Couples

I don’t think it’s possible to completely differentiate between hard and soft femme. All of femme is at once hard and soft.

As the name suggests, power lesbians are ambitious, awe-inspiring women. Some call them “suits.” According to YourTango’s definition, “the power lesbian is a lesbian with her shit together! She’s the leader in her field, the top of the tops.” She’s influential, competent, and maybe just a smidge elitist. The power lesbian type can come in all shapes and forms — actresses, sports icons, news reporters, politicians — as long as she’s good at what she does. This isn’t an incredibly polite term, but it is widespread as people continually reposition themselves along the spectrum of sexuality.

Some call these types of women stud-fems (or stems for short) because they’re somewhere in between gender norms. A subset of butch lesbians are known as diesel dykes. “In some lesbian circles, Diesel Dyke refers to a very butch Big-Rig (or other heavy equipment) driving lesbian,”explains LesbianLife.

Viva la revolution! If you’re an activist lesbian, more power to you. These kick-ass lesbians are the ones marching on Washington, boycotting homophobic bakeries, and petitioning legislators to make real and positive change for their brothers and sisters in the LGBTQ community. Some of these types of lesbian labels aren’t so flattering, but Gold Star Lesbian is definitely meant to be a badge of honor among lesbians. QueersUnited defines this lesbian type as“a lesbian who has never had sexual relations with a man and does not intend to.” She’s lesbian through and through — and proud of it.

Archived from the original on February 20, 2007. 1903 depiction of women in "femme" and "butch" apparelPrior to the middle of the 20th century in Western culture, homosexual societies were mostly underground or secret, making it difficult to determine how long butch and femme roles have been practiced by women. In the spectrum of traditionally masculine and feminine traits, soft butches (aka chapstick lesbians) come down somewhere in the middle.

Hence the name. These casual gals are generally known for preferring comfortable clothing but still leaning toward the stereotypically girly side. You won’t find blue jean femmes in skirts or dresses, at least according to Urban Dictionary. “Soft butches generally physically, sexually, and romantically express themselves in more masculine than feminine ways,” reads Wikipedia’s official definition.

Basically, these are very tough women. We did a little digging into what lesbians on the web are saying and pulled together a list of 17 lesbian types. From amusing shorthand to terms of endearment, these lesbian stereotypes are just a small slice of the myriad of flavors in the LGBTQ community. Moreover, the term has been adopted by scholars in academic papers and books as it identifies a sub-group of lesbianism which further aids in the exploration of sexual fluidity. For instance, academics have written about "chapstick lesbian" as a form of secondary identity within Queer culture.

, ” my answer is, “the kind that likes women.” I get it. It is human nature to seek order and understanding through labels and classification systems. Interestingly, most of the descriptions of types of lesbians related to gender expression, not sexual orientation. Christopher, Megan (29 September 2019).

The meanings of these terms vary and can evolve over time. Goodloe, Amy (1993). "Lesbian Identity and the Politics of Butch-Femme Roles".

Emotional? Feminine?

Hard femme theory is relevant and has moved femininity and queerness in ways that are extraordinarily valuable. There are still hard femmes, just as there have always been soft femmes — this concept isn’t necessarily new, just building new momentum.

Those who identify as butch and femme today often use the words to define their presentation and gender identity rather than strictly the role they play in a relationship, and that not all butches are attracted exclusively to femmes and not all femmes are exclusively attracted to butches, a departure from the historic norm. Besides the terms "butch" and "femme", there are a number of other terms used to describe the dress codes, the sexual behaviours, and/or the gender identities of the sexual subcultures who use them.

Chapstick lesbians prefer chapstick over lipstick and short hair over long hair — at leastaccording to QueersUnited’s Word of the Gay. A Chapstick Lesbian is a sub-group within lesbianism that became popularised by Ellen DeGeneres in 1997, during her show. It was originally constructed as response to the phrase "Lipstick lesbian" that emerged in 1990, which refers to a Femme lesbian who emphasises their female identity through their self-presentation. The slang term "Chapstick Lesbian" identifies a category on the Femme-Butch lesbian continuum, where the female homosexual has a gender identity bias towards Femme lesbianism, although does not identify or fit the criteria of being a Lipstick lesbian. The word is frequently used as an alternative to the term "Soft-butch" lesbian or androgynous.

We’ve defined the following lesbian terms without judgment and with a full understanding that an individual is much more than just a label. Our intention isn’t to offend but to help singles keep up with common lesbian slang and attract a date by understanding existing social dynamics among lesbians.

There are all different types of lesbians out there, and it’s healthy to explore your own identity. Whether you want to figure out where you fit in or share a laugh with your friends online, a lesbian type quiz can help you in a few simple questions. Finally, to wrap up our list, we have the hippie, vegan lesbian stereotype.

The key attributes recognisable of a Chapstick Lesbian is that they have a casual dress-code and lack of desire to wear make-up. Next to this, they are also viewed as being athletic in nature and have a notable interest in sport. When asked, ” What kind of lesbian am I?

My interest in softness and soft femme is not an attempt to create a hierarchy of femme wherein soft femme reigns for being “new” and “progressive,” and hard femme is passé. Hard femme is dope.

These tree-huggers are all about peace, empathy, and social good. One blog post, sassily titled “Being Vegan is SO Gay,” argues that a sensitivity for the oppressed leads the LGBTQ community to turn vegetarian or vegan in higher numbers than the straight community. Progressive thinking and tofu stir-fry are the stereotypical monikers of this type of lesbian.

The femme theory being produced now refers to the existing body of femme theory and its own social and cultural context. The word femme is taken from the French word for woman. The word butch, meaning "masculine", may have been coined by abbreviating the word butcher, as first noted in George Cassidy's nickname, Butch Cassidy.[9] However, the exact origin of the word is still unknown.

What do we mean when we say hard? Political? Difficult?

"How Butch/Femme Subcultures Allow Gay Women to Thrive". Vice. Blue jeans lesbians are a subset of femme (or feminine) women who prefer to wear jeans.

Tender? All reclamation and revaluation of femininity is political, difficult, and tough in a patriarchal society. All femmes are hard femmes, even when they are soft (I have written a little more about this here).This combination of hardness and softness is well documented in the femme community. NYC femme educator, writer, and artist Kim Milan conducted a workshop at the 2012 FemmeCon deconstructing femmephobia titled “In Fierceness and Vulnerability” (the prezi is onlinehere). Toronto femme artist Dainty Smith regularly uses the hashtag #toughtendergirls on Instagram, and Jessica Luxery and others use #hardlooks4softgirls.

So, I compare hard and soft femme not to create a binary where there is not one, but to show growth, movement, and multiplicity in our theories of femme. Femme theory doesn’t emerge fully formed from a vacuum, it is referential and contextual. The femme theory produced by McHugh and Duggan emerged from its own context, a product of postmodernist thought and a response to queer theory’s (and queer culture’s) celebration of other gender benders.

My interest is to dislodge a dominant or singular definition of femme. Soft femme won’t fit everyone, and hard femme doesn’t fit me. Hard femme and soft femme are capable of doing different things for gender and queer theory, and folding different people into the conversation. Do you have questions about sexual orientation and gender identity? Head to our discussion board for help.

These youthful gals tend to be attracted to older partners. On the other side of the coin, you have the butch lesbians. These studs are known for their short hair, assertiveness, and other traditionally masculine traits. Well-known butch lesbians include Jane Lynch, Tig Notaro, and Suze Orman.

Tough? Mean? What do we mean when we say soft?

Is it a submissive butch? A playful LGBTQ person into casual sex? A young trans man? Yes to all. Effingdykes describes boi lesbians as“extremely boyish-looking girls.” Sounds about right.

Butch, femme, stem, tall, short— I like all kinds of lesbians (as the French would say, lesbiennes). Purr.

Maybe they rock a tie and high heels to work, for instance. Soft butches generally appear androgynous, not quite butch but not quite femme either.

I don’t think it’s possible to completely differentiate between hard and soft femme. All of femme is at once hard and soft.

Butch – a masculine lesbian woman. Often opting for a more masculine approach to style.

A hasbian refers to a woman who used to identify as a lesbian and is now in a heterosexual relationship or identifying as straight or bisexual. If you know what emo is (a style of rock music with emotional undertones) and you know what lesbians are (women who are attracted to women), then you can probably figure out what emo lesbians are. Typical markers of the emo lesbian include things like wearing heavy eyeliner, dying her hair bright colors, lamenting the patriarchy, and jamming to hardcore music. The term “boi” isn’t so cut and dry. With all these types of lesbians, there’s more than a little wiggle room, but particularly with boi lesbians, the internet doesn’t seem to have a consensus on what the label means exactly.

Archived from the original on February 20, 2007. 1903 depiction of women in "femme" and "butch" apparelPrior to the middle of the 20th century in Western culture, homosexual societies were mostly underground or secret, making it difficult to determine how long butch and femme roles have been practiced by women. In the spectrum of traditionally masculine and feminine traits, soft butches (aka chapstick lesbians) come down somewhere in the middle.

Some call these types of women stud-fems (or stems for short) because they’re somewhere in between gender norms. A subset of butch lesbians are known as diesel dykes. “In some lesbian circles, Diesel Dyke refers to a very butch Big-Rig (or other heavy equipment) driving lesbian,”explains LesbianLife.

As the name suggests, power lesbians are ambitious, awe-inspiring women. Some call them “suits.” According to YourTango’s definition, “the power lesbian is a lesbian with her shit together! She’s the leader in her field, the top of the tops.” She’s influential, competent, and maybe just a smidge elitist. The power lesbian type can come in all shapes and forms — actresses, sports icons, news reporters, politicians — as long as she’s good at what she does. This isn’t an incredibly polite term, but it is widespread as people continually reposition themselves along the spectrum of sexuality.

Viva la revolution! If you’re an activist lesbian, more power to you. These kick-ass lesbians are the ones marching on Washington, boycotting homophobic bakeries, and petitioning legislators to make real and positive change for their brothers and sisters in the LGBTQ community. Some of these types of lesbian labels aren’t so flattering, but Gold Star Lesbian is definitely meant to be a badge of honor among lesbians. QueersUnited defines this lesbian type as“a lesbian who has never had sexual relations with a man and does not intend to.” She’s lesbian through and through — and proud of it.

Basically, these are very tough women. We did a little digging into what lesbians on the web are saying and pulled together a list of 17 lesbian types. From amusing shorthand to terms of endearment, these lesbian stereotypes are just a small slice of the myriad of flavors in the LGBTQ community. Moreover, the term has been adopted by scholars in academic papers and books as it identifies a sub-group of lesbianism which further aids in the exploration of sexual fluidity. For instance, academics have written about "chapstick lesbian" as a form of secondary identity within Queer culture.

We’ve defined the following lesbian terms without judgment and with a full understanding that an individual is much more than just a label. Our intention isn’t to offend but to help singles keep up with common lesbian slang and attract a date by understanding existing social dynamics among lesbians.

Hence the name. These casual gals are generally known for preferring comfortable clothing but still leaning toward the stereotypically girly side. You won’t find blue jean femmes in skirts or dresses, at least according to Urban Dictionary. “Soft butches generally physically, sexually, and romantically express themselves in more masculine than feminine ways,” reads Wikipedia’s official definition.

There are all different types of lesbians out there, and it’s healthy to explore your own identity. Whether you want to figure out where you fit in or share a laugh with your friends online, a lesbian type quiz can help you in a few simple questions. Finally, to wrap up our list, we have the hippie, vegan lesbian stereotype.