Crossed Grain

The Crossed Grain Trademark is registered and protected across the European Union, Switzerland, Norway, Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia and Bosnia Herzegovina.

The Association of European Coeliac Societies (AOECS) is a not-for-profit umbrella organization of 35 European national celiac societies. Its Crossed Grain symbol, which is licensed to companies meeting the requirements of the AOECS Standard for Gluten-Free Foods, signifies safety for consumers.

Until the FDA rules go into effect, there is no standard for gluten-free labeling in the United States other than a general rule that a label has to be truthful. While wheat, barley and rye are prohibited in gluten-free foods, gluten from cross-contamination is not taken into account. This means a wide range of the company’s finished products are certified gluten-free by Coeliac UK, Europe’s largest coeliac disease charity, and are licensed to carry the Crossed Grain symbol. Even with food products regulated by the USDA, there are very few ingredients that should cause you any concern. Modified food starch, dextrin, and starch (in USDA-regulated foods “starch” may mean corn starch or wheat starch) may give you pause if their source is not named.

FALCPA does not apply to barley, rye, and oats but most ingredients that were questionable in the past were suspect because of the possibility they contained wheat. If barley is contained in a food product the ingredient name will almost always include the word “barley” or “malt”. Ingredients that contain rye and oats will generally include the words “rye” and “oats”. Licence to use the Crossed Grain Trademark on all approved product packaging, marketing, website, point of sales and promotions. If you are a food manufacturer and would like to know how you can use the Crossed Grain symbol on your products, please read more about licensing the Crossed Grain symbol.

Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

It also shows that the product is gluten free. There are different types of licence for the symbol based on where the product is sold and what ingredients are used. You can tell what kind of licence the product has by the licence number shown alongside the symbol. For a full list of products that are not permitted to display the Crossed Grain symbol please see Appendix One of the AOECS Standard.

At Kea Cookies we have recently been awarded the Crossed Grain logo by Coeliac New Zealand for our range of cookies. The easiest way to identify gluten free products is to look for the word ‘gluten free” on the front of the package, which will ideally be accompanied by the symbol of the ear of wheat with the cross through it (‘Crossed Grain’ symbol). For individuals with coeliac disease and gluten and wheat sensitivity, it is particularly important to pay attention to the labelling of gluten content when purchasing foods. The Crossed Grain symbol is covered by and may only be reproduced on labels and/or other packaging if the product in question has been submitted to the rigorous testing of the holder. Furthermore, if this process has been satisfactorily carried out, the symbol would carry additional markings to identify the origin, originator and specific licence number.

Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements. Under the FDA rules any food labeled “gluten free” will have to contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten from all sources, including ingredients and cross-contamination. Wheat, barley and rye are banned outright and any ingredient made from these gluten-containing grains cannot be used unless processed to remove gluten to the extent that the finished food contains less than 20 ppm.

You may be wondering about foods not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration—meat products, poultry products, and egg products. These foods are regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

It is a sign of safety and integrity that is trusted by consumers. A recent Coeliac UK membership survey indicated that our members actively seek out the symbol as a source of trust and reassurance when making product choices and it is seen as the most important means of communicating that a product is safe for the gluten-free diet. The Crossed Grain logo is a certified trademark owned by Coeliac New Zealand for the certification of products produced and licensed in New Zealand, and sold in New Zealand and Australia. Internationally recognised, the Crossed Grain symbol can only be displayed by food manufacturers whose ingredients and production processes pass rigorous testing to ensure they are gluten free. Coeliac UK, a member of the AOECS, offers Crossed Grain Symbol certification for food and drink manufacturers and retailers, for products sold in the UK, Europe and globally.

The USDA does not have mandatory allergen labeling at this time but they encourage manufacturers to voluntarily list allergens, including wheat on food labels. A number of gluten-free food makers already meet the requirements spelled out by the Food and Drug Administration in the regulations approved Friday. Many of the final rules are the same as those proposed by the FDA in 2007. A number of food companies have voluntarily started to follow the proposed rules in anticipation they would ultimately be adopted by the FDA and won’t have to change labels.

December 29, 2014August 5, 2013Many of the gluten-free products on store shelves will look exactly the same as they do now once new gluten-free labeling rules go into effect next August. The Gluten-Free Food Services (GFFS) Training and Accreditation Program, a program of GIG, is designed to work with all food service establishments who wish to provide for and serve gluten-free consumers. GFFS works with experts in food preparation to develop, educate, and train service establishments to meet and adhere to the highest gluten-free standards. Crossed Grain is our charity newsletter and details all of the exciting news and events that we have at Coeliac UK. It is issued quarterly and means we can keep our members and supporters up to date with our activities and our community news. This type of licence number shows that the products are gluten free and sold outside of Europe.

This certification covers more than 40 of the company's food product references, which will soon carry the ELS seal, an international symbol recognized by all those who must follow a gluten-free diet. Amongst the products under this certification, Soria Natural clients will now find some of the company's best-selling organic food products including its range of gluten-free biscuits, breakfast cereals, snacks, croquettes, pasties and crackerbreads. Dalziel Ingredients – the UK specialist in bespoke seasoning blends, cures and functional ingredients – has been awarded the prestigious Crossed Grain symbol by Coeliac UK for its gluten-free products. This simplified label reading is due in large part to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (otherwise known as FALCPA). This act mandates that if an ingredient in a food product contains protein from wheat, the word “wheat” must be included on the food label.

The crossed-grain symbol brings great confidence to the celiac collective and also to the rest of consumers, as it serves as a quick and easy reference when buying gluten-free products. 8th August 2012 Mash Direct is pleased to announce that 13 of our products have been certified as gluten free by Coeliac UK and licensed to carry theCrossed Grain symbol. The Crossed Grain logo is the symbol both nationally and internationally recognised by those who need to follow a gluten free diet.

The logo gives consumers a quick reference point when shopping. Since November 2005, 14 allergens contained in foods, including ‘cereals containing gluten and products manufactured from them’ must be listed on the package if they are contained as an ingredient in the product, regardless of the form or volume in which they are contained.For an overview of cereals containing gluten, please consult the article about gluten. Dalziel Ingredients has invested heavily in its state-of-the-art factory and new product development centre in Gateshead, where it has a dedicated gluten-free line.

FALCPA applies to foods regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–all foods with the exception of meat products, poultry products, and egg products. Natural food stores like Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods, as well as an increasing number of regular supermarkets sell an abundance of foods labeled “gluten-free.” For foods not labeled “gluten-free” you can tell if they are made using gluten-free ingredients by reading the food label.

For more information on obtaining a license for the use of the Crossed Grain symbol, please contact [email protected] The CGT provides buyers with a quick reference point whilst out shopping. This is particularly important when the consumer is unsure on the gluten status of a product, or whilst travelling and unable to understand the language in which the label is displayed. It is a quality and safety guarantee as all producers wishing to use it must conform to high and safe standards of production.

Inclusion of company details on the Coeliac UK website within the Crossed Grain licensees Directory. The certification lasts for a full year from the date that the certification is taken out. We charge an annual certification fee which varies according to the turnover and exports of the gluten free products listed in the certification.

Soria Natural has obtained the international crossed-grain certification as a producer and packer of gluten-free food products in accordance with the European Licensing System (ELS) Soria Natural has just obtained the gluten-free certification as a producer and packer of gluten-free food products in accordance with the European Licensing System (ELS). Sir, It was great to see your Focus on… free from reporton the rise and rise of this once niche category. And we couldn’t help but notice the Crossed Grain symbol as the go-to gluten-free image used liberally across the images. A wide range of products from our everyday Mashed Potato, to special occasion products like Duck Fat Roast Potatoes and barbecue favourites Potato Cakes have a been shown to have met the required standard set by Coeliac UK. A full list of products displaying the Crossed Grain symbol can be found at the end of the page.

Sign up to our mailing list and keep up to date with the latest developments in coeliac disease research, events, news and more. The CGT can only be licensed for multiple ingredient and/or processed products. Your products must meet a range of criteria to ensure that they are gluten free, both in terms of the ingredients and the production process.

Food products certified with our Crossed Grain symbol are gluten free and suitable for people with coeliac disease. If you see products with this symbol on, you know they’ve gone through our process and we’ve seen test certificates, so they are safe for your gluten free diet. What many of your readers may not realise is that the symbol was designed by the husband of a Coeliac UK member, Michael Carpenter, in the late 1960s, who generously gifted the to the charity. Fifty years later the symbol is internationally recognised by those who need to follow a gluten-free diet and is protected by and trademark registrations owned by Coeliac UK on behalf of the gluten-free community.

You may want to find another product that does not contain these ingredients or contact the manufacturer to verify gluten-free status. Naturally gluten-free foods can be labeled gluten free. This is a change from the proposed rules which would have prohibited the gluten-free label on inherently gluten-free foods including gluten-free grains and products like bottled water unless the label also said all foods of the same type were also gluten free. The final rule addresses concerns that some gluten-free grains, legumes and seeds have a high risk of cross-contamination. A gluten-free label on these kinds of products “provide the expectation that any gluten is less than 20 ppm,” the FDA says.

Sweeteners made from wheat, such as glucose syrup, dextrose or maltodextrin, are excluded from this labelling directive because no gluten is detectable in these products. Dalziel Ingredients’ product development team advises food manufacturers on new flavour concepts and trends, market analysis, factory processes, recipe formulations and product quality enhancements – increasing yields, salt reductions, improved texture and fat reduction. All Dalziel Ingredients’ products – seasonings, complete mixes, rubs, glazes, functional blends, batters, crumbs, snack seasonings, cures and brines – can be developed as gluten free, and existing products can re reformulated to be gluten free.

It is promoted by celiac organizations worldwide and is recognized internationally. This means that you no longer have to sweat over many of the usual suspect ingredients—modified food starch and dextrin to name a couple. Regardless of whether these ingredients are included in an FDA-regulated food product, if you don’t see the word “wheat” on the label the food does not include any ingredients containing wheat protein. It really is that simple.

This type of licence number shows that the product is gluten free as well as where the company is based. UK companies will have a licence number starting with GB. Companies based in other European countries will have different codes, e.g. BE for Belgium or GR for Greece. Our Crossed Grain symbol is a quick and easy way of identifying foods you can eat.

To use the Crossed Grain Trademark, your products must meet a range of criteria to ensure that they are gluten free, both in terms of the ingredients and the production process. The Crossed Grain Trademark is an internationally registered Trademark and can only be used under licence on food and drink products that meet our criteria.

Food makers can continue to use advisory statements such as, “Made in a factory that also processes wheat products” on a food that also has a gluten-free label. The FDA says it will need to “look at foods on a case by case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement with a gluten-free claim would be misleading.” Any product with the advisory statement and gluten-free label would have to meet the FDA requirements. Under the FDA rules any food labeled “gluten free” will have to contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten from all sources, including ingredients and cross-contamination. Wheat, barley and rye are banned outright and any ingredient made from these gluten-containing grains cannot be used unless processed to remove gluten to the extent that the finished food contains less than 20 ppm.

In an environment where food labels and legislative changes can be bewildering for someone on a gluten free diet, the Crossed Grain Trademark has proven to provide consumers with a quick reference point. When faced with uncertainty on the gluten status of a product it plays an important role in influencing people making gluten free product choices. The label format is left up to food makers; the FDA does not have a mandated design or any requirements for where the gluten-free label has to be placed. No universal symbol will appear on packages to indicate that a food meets the FDA gluten-free standard. If a food company wants to indicate that a product meets the standard, it has to use one of the gluten-free terms.

Some manufacturers and supermarkets use their own symbol to show that a food is gluten free. These symbols do not have licence numbers. This type of licence number shows that the product is gluten free, where the company is based and that the product contains gluten free oats. This type of licence number shows that the company is based in the UK and is selling their products mostly in the UK.

The Crossed Grain Trademark is registered and protected across the European Union, Switzerland, Norway, Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia and Bosnia Herzegovina.

At Kea Cookies we have recently been awarded the Crossed Grain logo by Coeliac New Zealand for our range of cookies. The easiest way to identify gluten free products is to look for the word ‘gluten free” on the front of the package, which will ideally be accompanied by the symbol of the ear of wheat with the cross through it (‘Crossed Grain’ symbol). For individuals with coeliac disease and gluten and wheat sensitivity, it is particularly important to pay attention to the labelling of gluten content when purchasing foods. The Crossed Grain symbol is covered by and may only be reproduced on labels and/or other packaging if the product in question has been submitted to the rigorous testing of the holder. Furthermore, if this process has been satisfactorily carried out, the symbol would carry additional markings to identify the origin, originator and specific licence number.

It also shows that the product is gluten free. There are different types of licence for the symbol based on where the product is sold and what ingredients are used. You can tell what kind of licence the product has by the licence number shown alongside the symbol. For a full list of products that are not permitted to display the Crossed Grain symbol please see Appendix One of the AOECS Standard.

Gluten-free labeling continues to be voluntary so even products that are gluten free may not be labeled as such. This is likely to come up most often with naturally gluten-free products with a low risk of cross-contamination, fruits and vegetables for example. The lack of a gluten-free label does not mean the food contains gluten.

The Association of European Coeliac Societies (AOECS) is a not-for-profit umbrella organization of 35 European national celiac societies. Its Crossed Grain symbol, which is licensed to companies meeting the requirements of the AOECS Standard for Gluten-Free Foods, signifies safety for consumers.

Until the FDA rules go into effect, there is no standard for gluten-free labeling in the United States other than a general rule that a label has to be truthful. While wheat, barley and rye are prohibited in gluten-free foods, gluten from cross-contamination is not taken into account. This means a wide range of the company’s finished products are certified gluten-free by Coeliac UK, Europe’s largest coeliac disease charity, and are licensed to carry the Crossed Grain symbol. Even with food products regulated by the USDA, there are very few ingredients that should cause you any concern. Modified food starch, dextrin, and starch (in USDA-regulated foods “starch” may mean corn starch or wheat starch) may give you pause if their source is not named.

FALCPA does not apply to barley, rye, and oats but most ingredients that were questionable in the past were suspect because of the possibility they contained wheat. If barley is contained in a food product the ingredient name will almost always include the word “barley” or “malt”. Ingredients that contain rye and oats will generally include the words “rye” and “oats”. Licence to use the Crossed Grain Trademark on all approved product packaging, marketing, website, point of sales and promotions. If you are a food manufacturer and would like to know how you can use the Crossed Grain symbol on your products, please read more about licensing the Crossed Grain symbol.

You may be wondering about foods not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration—meat products, poultry products, and egg products. These foods are regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).